Theologian studies evolution

first_img “We’re going to [be] working out important questions, theological questions, about what it means to be human, but in the light of not just the internal, theological context but in the light of the understanding of science,” she said. Deane-Drummond will continue that mission this fall, leading a team of scientists, theologians, anthropologists, psychologists and others in a study called, “Inquiry on Evolution and Human Nature.” Deane-Drummond said she herself has a multi-disciplinary background, as she holds a doctorate in theology and another in plant physiology. “In my previous major monograph on systematic theology, I looked at Christology and how we could envisage a Christology that made sense in the light of evolutionary theory,” Deane-Drummond said. “This particular [study] is looking at human nature in the light of other animals but also our own evolutionary origins,” she said. “I’ve moved from Christology to human nature, and the questions I began to ask at the end of my Christology book were about human nature. So this book follows on from that directly.” “The first part of the process is getting the team together for the year,” she said. “There’s an application process, and it is in itself highly competitive.” Each researcher will pursue his or her own individual monograph project, Deane-Drummond said. She said the study will pick up her research right where she left off. She said she would also like all the researchers to eventually produce a collaborative project. “The point of this is to bring together …  a multidisciplinary team to contribute to sharing what they are researching in their own areas around this topic so that we feel … we are far better informed when we come to consider the crucial questions,” she said. “We will probably produce a book on evolution, human nature and religion, or something like that, which will show the fruits of our mutual conversation as well as our individual projects,” she said. The study, which strives to facilitate interdisciplinary dialogue, is sponsored by Center for Theological Inquiry (CTI) in Princeton, N.J., and will take place during the 2012-2013 academic year. “The project itself is very exciting because there are questions also that scientists would not think of asking without the dialogue with the humanities,” she said. “I’m not suggesting that theology necessarily informs the message of science, but theology will certainly push science to ask questions in a different kind of way than they might otherwise have done.” Deane-Drummond, along with co-leader Dominic Johnson of the University of Edinburgh, is reviewing research applications for eight research fellows and two post-doctoral fellows to participate in the study.   Deane-Drummond said the study will facilitate a cooperation between the two disciplines. Theology professor Celia Deane-Drummond has spent 20 years of her career bridging the gap between science and theology. She said that in today’s world, it is important to reconcile science and theology. Deane-Drummond said the research team will address large theological questions from multiple angles. “I’m working on forms of theological thinking that make sense in a scientifically engaged culture,” she said.last_img read more

Fr. Jenkins to serve on Commission on College Basketball

first_imgUniversity President Fr. John Jenkins will serve on the newly formed Commission on College Basketball, the University announced in a press release Wednesday. He will be one of 14 members on the commission.“[The commission] will examine critical aspects of Division I men’s basketball in the wake of recent investigations into the sport by the FBI,” the press release said.The commission was created by decision of the NCAA Board of Governors, Division I Board of Directors and NCAA president Mark Emmert, according to the release.According to the release, main issues the commission will focus on are: “the relations of the NCAA national office, member institutions, student-athletes and coaches with outside entities, including apparel companies, agents and non-scholastic basketball; the NCAA’s relationship with the NBA, including the league’s so-called ‘one-and-done’ rule; [and] creating the right relationship between NCAA member universities and colleges and the national office to promote transparency and accountability.”Five other commission members have connections to the University, according to the press release. Former Secretary of State and Notre Dame alumna Condoleezza Rice will chair it. Two honorary degree recipients — Mary Sue Coleman, president of the Association of American Universities, and Martin Dempsey, retired army general and former chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff — will serve on the commission, as will Notre Dame parent and member of the NBA Hall of Fame David Robinson and Ohio State University athletic director and Notre Dame alumnus Gene Smith.Tags: basketball, Commission on College Basketball, Fr. John Jenkins, University Presidentlast_img read more

From Great Neck to Great Gatsby: F. Scott Fitzgerald’s L.I. Journey

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York [dropcap]F[/dropcap]. Scott Fitzgerald could recall his Great Neck address, drunk or sober. But these days he might need a second or two to recognize the place his wife Zelda once called their “nifty little Babbitt-house,” back when Sinclair Lewis’ biting satire about American conformity was all the rage among the cognoscenti.Today the two-story cream-colored stucco mansion has a terra cotta roof and a small balcony with a white colonnade above the front door, exuding an elegance that the place probably didn’t have when the young Fitzgerald family rented it in 1922 while their daughter Scottie was still a baby.The landscaping is likely more lush and well-manicured than when he and his wife passed out on the front lawn after somehow driving home in their second-hand Rolls from a long night of partying at The Plaza only to be awakened by their housekeeper in the cold morning light. These days nobody could navigate 20 miles of Northern Boulevard with a blood-alcohol level like theirs without running into the police or worse.Perhaps the biggest change is that the studio above the garage where Fitzgerald cranked out his lucrative short stories for The Saturday Evening Post and began a first draft of what would become The Great Gatsby is now connected seamlessly to the main building. It can no longer offer the kind of solitude he used to find there when he had to get away from what Zelda later described as the “disorder and quarrels.”This Gatsby connection was a surprise to the high school sophomore now residing with his family on Gateway Drive.“Wow, I didn’t know that!” he tells me, preferring that his name not appear in print. He’d just been watching SportsCenter on ESPN when this reporter recently showed up at his door.He admitted that, like most adolescent American boys, he hadn’t yet read the classic novel because it hadn’t been assigned in school.“Maybe I’ll see the movie,” he says, unconvincingly.He wouldn’t have to go very far to catch it, if he was so inclined. A new Gatsby film has just come out—marking the fourth time since 1926 that someone has tried to capture cinematically Fitzgerald’s lyrical prose that retells the tragic tale of one self-made man’s obsession with the American Dream.The book has hit the bestseller list—something it never did while Fitzgerald was alive. The movie reviews, so far, have been mixed at best.“You don’t realize just how much misguided damage can be done to a great novel until it is vaporized by a pretentious hack like boneheaded Australian director Baz Luhrmann,” wrote Rex Reed in The New York Observer.A page from Ruth Prigozy’s photo book on F. Scott Fitzgerald shows how much his Great Neck home has changed. (Rashed Mian/Long Island Press)Luhrmann (Moulin Rouge and Romeo + Juliet) spent more than a $100 million to try what has never succeeded before: turn this literary masterpiece into a compelling movie. But he gave it his best shot, this time in 3-D with a contemporary soundtrack produced by Jay-Z.Days before The Great Gatsby opened nationwide in May, Luhrmann, a soft-spoken, slender figure with silver hair, was on hand at the refurbished Soundview Cinemas in Port Washington where Warner Brothers was hosting a special screening. With earnestness he told me that he regards Gatsby as “America’s Hamlet.”Asked whether his latest cinematic creation was “The Greatest Gatsby” yet made, the director demurred but he defended his version.“It’s actually an incredible reflection of this time we’re in!” he says, standing on the red carpet rolled out in the lobby.After the film, presented by the Gold Coast Arts Center and the Town of North Hempstead on May 8th, invited guests were going to an exclusive “Gatsby-themed” party at Sands Point Preserve. Luhrmann’s lead, Leonardo DiCaprio, who plays Jay Gatsby with magnetic fervor, did not attend the screening.His Oscar-worthy performance is arguably the only bright spot in an otherwise “mediocre” film, according to Hofstra English professor Ruth Prigozy, co-founder of the F. Scott Fitzgerald Society. “It was all the parties—you didn’t really get character development,” she says.Prigozy was particularly disappointed with how Long Island fared in the movie, in contrast to its seminal importance in the novel (West Egg was representative of Great Neck/Kings Point; East Egg symbolized Manhasset/Sands Point). In preparing for the production, a studio researcher had consulted her and she emphasized the waters of Manhasset Bay that separated Gatsby from Daisy Buchanan, his obsession. In the final film, Luhrmann didn’t shoot anywhere on the Gold Coast.For Fitzgerald, “Long Island was the start,” says Prigozy. “Long Island gave him the basic idea.” But inspiration for Gatsby did not come in 1918 when Fitzgerald was stationed at Camp Mills, an encampment near Garden City. He was hoping to be sent to France but the war ended before he could go overseas.Fitzgerald made a name for himself a few years later in New York as the author of This Side of Paradise, which evoked the restlessness of his generation as the Jazz Age dawned. He was a successful writer, married and a father. The suburbs beckoned.Back then, Great Neck was a precursor to Hollywood, in part because the Astoria studios were in their glory and the bright lights of Broadway were nearby. The newly minted millionaires mingled with the celebrities from show business such as Sam Goldwyn, Eddie Cantor, Joan Crawford, Paulette Goddard, Charlie Chaplin, W.C. Fields, George M. Cohan, Groucho Marx, and Ed Wynn. Herbert Swope, the editor of the New York World, hosted many parties at his Kings Point estate, which Fitzgerald attended with his neighborhood pal, Ring Lardner, a well-known sportswriter, who lived on East Shore Road with his wife Ellis. In 1925, when The Great Gatsby was published, Lardner had notably written that “Mr. Fitzgerald is a novelist and Mrs. Fitzgerald is a novelty.”The flapper with the sultry figures in her eyes evokes the provocative mood of the times on the cover of the first edition of The Great Gatsby.“Kings Point was a very elegant place but it looked across to Sands Point,” says Prigozy, “and Sands Point was the place for society.”So if Kings Point was for the social climbers, the palatial estates across the bay were for the top rungs of America’s landed aristocracy, where the Pratts, Whitneys, Roosevelts, Fricks, DuPonts, and the Vanderbilts gave the Gold Coast its name.Fitzgerald and Lardner gazed across the bay and “that’s where they got it,” Prigozy says, “where Fitzgerald got that inspiration.”At one of Swope’s parties Fitzgerald met Arnold Rothstein, a notorious gambler who had fixed the 1919 World Series (the infamous “Black Sox” scandal). Rothstein, who became a model for Meyer Wolfsheim in the novel, was linked to a Great Neck neighbor of Fitzgerald’s named Edward M. Fuller. With his crooked brokerage firm partner William McGee, Fuller had been convicted of gambling away millions of dollars of their customers’ money. For his portrait of Tom Buchanan, Daisy’s super-rich husband, Fitzgerald drew upon his friendship with the patrician polo star Tommy Hitchcock, whom Fitzgerald saw play championship matches at the Meadow Brook Club in Nassau.These early influences may explain why Fitzgerald’s first working title for Gatsby was: Among the Ash-Heaps and Millionaires. His astute editor at Scribner’s, Maxwell Perkins, gently persuaded him to think again. After Fitzgerald sent Perkins the manuscript from Paris, he still wanted to tinker around with the title, suggesting Trimalchio in West Egg. Perkins read the finished manuscript in one sitting and told Fitzgerald he thought the novel “splendid.” But that title didn’t cut it, he cabled the author, explaining that nobody would recognize Great Neck nor remember that Trimalchio was the decadent Roman parvenu encouraging debauchery at his banquet in Petronius’ Satyricon. As for “egg,” a family friend, Arnold Turnbull, later wrote that while Fitzgerald was living in Great Neck, his “magic word was ‘egg.’ People he liked were ‘good eggs’…and people he didn’t like were ‘bad eggs’ or ‘unspeakable eggs.’”Although The Great Gatsby was a critical success but a commercial failure, Fitzgerald remained forever proud of it. In 1930, he wrote Zelda, who was then hospitalized after having a mental breakdown, that he had dragged the novel “out of the pit of my stomach in a time of misery.” More importantly, he had stuck to his vision, refusing to focus on “hauntedness…rejecting in advance…all of the ordinary material for Long Island, big crooks, adultery theme & always starting from the small focal point that impressed me—my own meeting with Arnold Rothstein for instance…”Fitzgerald lived in Great Neck from 1922 to 1924, but it made an indelible impression. He began The Great Gatsby there and finished it in Paris when he was only 28 years old. Despite his relative youthfulness, he managed to speak for the ages.“I think it’s a book that’s always going to be relevant because it’s really about our vision of our country as we want it,” says Prigozy. “And we do want to be the country that Fitzgerald also wanted—and that the characters wanted—that somebody could go from nowhere to become somebody.”But in the end, Gatsby’s true roots lie exposed and he never does escape his past, let alone live in the future he had dreamed of, with the love of his life. And so, using Long Island’s unforgiving but inviting geography—so close yet so far—to depict the great divides of wealth and class, Fitzgerald instills yet one more lesson that the American Dream can only go so far.“Here’s to you old sport!” Leonardo DiCaprio plays Jay Gatsby as the perfect host with the imperfect past. (Photo: Warner Bros.)last_img read more

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Rent and tenant board told to do their work or resign

first_imgLocalNews Rent and tenant board told to do their work or resign by: – March 21, 2012 Share Sharing is caring! Tweet Sharecenter_img Share 40 Views   4 comments Prime Minister Skerrit. Prime Minister Roosevelt Skerrit has lashed out at land lords in Dominica, who he says are taking advantage of their tenants.Prime Minister Skerrit told Government in Focus radio program recently, that tenants are paying for homes with less than adequate living facilities.He says the members of the Rent and Tenancy Boards are not conducting their duties properly.“I am sending a public message to the rent and tenant board that they have to do their work. There are too many people in this country who are being taken advantage of by land lords. People are living in less than adequate housing with no running water, no lights, poor washrooms, pipes are burst and landlords are refusing to fix it, leaking roofs, sinking floors and people are paying a lot of money for these homes. I don’t think it is right to have persons living in these conditions”.Skerrit said if members of the board wish to have their services discontinued, they should resign. “They have to do their work and protect the people of this country. Too many of these landlords are knocking two pieces of plywood’s together and renting that for 500 a month. It is not fair to the people. It is not fair to the single mothers who are working hard to make ends meet,” he said.The prime minister said he is willing to find someone who is willing to do the job of the rent and the tenancy board because they “are obviously not doing their work”.Dominica Vibes Newslast_img read more

Taiwan bridge collapses; 6 persons injured

first_imgTAIPEI – A bridge collapsed into a harborin northeastern Taiwan, crushing several fishing boats with some crew fearedtrapped, according to authorities. The bridge, which carries traffic overthe busy fishing port, damaged three fishing boats and two vehicles, includingan oil tanker around 9:30 a.m. on Tuesday, officials said.   At least nine people fell into thewater and seven were rescued, Taiwan’s Central News Agency said. Six peoplewere seriously injured.     A damaged car and debris from the collapsed Nanfang’ao Bridge are seen after a typhoon hit Su’ao in Yilan county, Taiwan on Oct. 1. XINMEI LIVE SEAFOOD VIA REUTERS Late on Monday, typhoon Mitag, packingmaximum winds of 162 kph (100 mph), swept past northeastern Taiwan, injuring 12people and cutting power to over 66,000 homes, with more than 150 flightscanceled.(Reuters)last_img read more

Man City face critical appeal against two-season European ban

first_imgPep Guardiola put his players through their paces this weekend.Read Also: Dutch legend confirms contact over Barcelona jobIf they are excluded, fifth would be good enough for the riches of next season’s Champions League, which are all the more valuable during the economic crisis caused by coronavirus.Just six points separate United from Crystal Palace in 11th leaving plenty to play for in the final nine games of the season once the Premier League restarts on June 17.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Kevin De Bruyne’s future could be placed in doubt if Man City’s appeal fails“Two years would be long. One year is something I might be able to cope with,” De Bruyne told Het Laatste Nieuws last month.City banked 93 million euros from prize money and television rights alone by reaching the quarter-finals of last season’s Champions League.The added loss of gate receipts and commercial revenue would make it extremely difficult for the club to meet FFP regulations in the future without cutting costs.City have steadfastly refuted UEFA’s allegations.“Based on our experience and our perception, this seems to be less about justice and more about politics,” said CEO of the City Football Group Ferran Soriano.UEFA has been under pressure, most publicly from La Liga president Javier Tebas, to impose a harder line on clubs backed by states, like City and Qatari-owned Paris Saint-Germain.European football’s governing body also have plenty riding on the case. Lose the appeal and the future of UEFA’s FFP regulations will be called into question.– Premier League impact –The hearing will be held by videoconference due to coronavirus restrictions from Monday to Wednesday.If no verdict is immediately announced after the hearing, the decision “could be made during the month of July,” said Matthieu Reeb, secretary general of CAS.Even if City’s appeal to CAS fails, the English champions could present a further appeal before the Swiss Federal Court.A delayed outcome would leave a cloud hanging over the return of the Premier League season.City seem certain to secure Champions League qualification on the field with a 12-point lead over fifth-placed Manchester United. Loading… However, billions of investment in players and managers has not yet been able to deliver the club’s first ever Champions League title. City are still involved in this season’s competition and will be allowed to compete should the 2019⁄20 edition of Champions League return in August no matter the outcome of the appeal. – Financial hit – But a two-season ban from the competition would represent a huge blow to the club’s prestige, finances and hope of hanging onto manager Pep Guardiola and key players like Kevin de Bruyne and Raheem Sterling.center_img City are accused of overstating sponsorship revenue to hide that they had not complied with UEFA’s financial fair play (FFP) rules between 2012 and 2016 and were also handed a 30 million euro ($34 million, £27 million) fine. UEFA’s case was prompted when German magazine Der Spiegel published a series of leaked emails in 2018 that purported to show how City manufactured extra sponsorship revenue from a series of companies with connections to the club’s Abu Dhabi-based owner Sheikh Mansour. Under the Sheikh’s ownership, City’s fortunes have been transformed from perennially living in the shadow of local rivals Manchester United to winning four Premier League titles in the past eight years.Advertisement Manchester City’s appeal against a two-year ban from European competition will be heard by the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) from Monday in a case of wide-reaching repercussions.last_img read more

Mason keen to succeed at Spurs

first_img A product of the Spurs academy, the midfielder made his debut for the club as a late substitute in the UEFA Cup as they won 1-0 at NEC Nijmegen in November 2008. Remarkably, it took nigh on six years – and loan spells at five different clubs – before finally making his first league appearance for the club, which even more astonishingly came for the 23-year-old as a starter in Saturday’s north London derby at Arsenal. Ryan Mason would not still be a Tottenham player if previous managers had their way – knock-backs which have fuelled his determination to succeed under Mauricio Pochettino. Press Association That is certainly a marked change from previous regimes, when desire and self-belief was the only thing keeping Mason at White Hart Lane “Obviously there have been times when I have questioned whether I would have to move away,” he said. “I’ve had a few opportunities to leave, but I wanted to play for Spurs so bad that I never really wanted to think about leaving. “I wanted to stay and give it a go and see what happened. Like I said, the change in manager helped me. “If previous managers were still in charge, maybe I wouldn’t be here.” Pochettino was full of praise for Mason after his impressive Premier League debut on a night which saw Jan Vertonghen start alongside Younes Kaboul. There has been talk of the Belgian having a strained relationship with the Spurs boss – suggestions which perplexed the former defender. “No, no, no,” Pochettino said. “Maybe because I pick players in different games but any problem with Jan, this is wrong. “We have a lot of games ahead and need to see and analyse the performance and analyse the situation after the game, maybe tired, maybe some problem, and after you need to manage. We have a strong squad and this is important.” The 1-1 draw capped a whirlwind week for Mason, which began with playing for the Under-21s at Sunderland and ended at the Emirates Stadium, via a match-changing wonder goal as Nottingham Forest were edged out of the Capital One Cup 3-1. “It’s been a massive week for me with three games in five days,” he said. “I played for the reserves on Monday, then against Nottingham Forest in the Capital One Cup on Wednesday and here.” That Forest match was just his fifth Spurs appearance and a first opportunity to feature under Pochettino – one which would no doubt have come sooner had it not been for injury curtailing an impressive pre-season. Mason thought ‘oh, here we go again’ at that point, but was also confident chances would be forthcoming under the former Argentina international after seeing him in action at Southampton. “I thought his appointment was promising,” he said. “He’s the type of gaffer that if you’re training well and playing well then you’ll get a chance to play. “That’s important, especially for me as a homegrown lad. “There are not many managers in the Premier League willing to put homegrown players in and trust them.” last_img read more

Three PBSO Deputies Hospitalized Due to Chemical Spill

first_imgThree PBSO deputies have been hospitalized after being exposed to chemicals from a mold remediation project in an unoccupied mobile home at the Seminole Colony Mobile Home Park in suburban West Palm Beach.Officials said the home was being treated for mold using a chemical that contains formaldehyde.The smell overcame three deputies when they arrived on scene, and those deputies were taken to the hospital.PBC Hazmat crew responds to SEMINOLE Colony community off Okeechobee Boulevard. Possibly one person transported. @WPTV pic.twitter.com/LEvrDOzPV6— Tania Rogers (@TaniaRogerswptv) May 28, 2019 Fire Rescue officials said the area has been cleared, and there is no danger to the community anymore.The Department of Environmental Protection will come out to collect the chemical.last_img

Primary Election Day, Polls Are Open

first_imgToday is Primary Election day in Florida.  The polls are now open and will close at 7:00 p.m.If you have not mailed your vote-by-mail ballot, you still have time to hand-deliver it to the Supervisor of Elections office.Palm Beach County supervisor of Elections Wendy Sartore Link says voters can feel very safe from the coronavirus while casting their ballot today.Hand sanitizer, single-use pens, plexi partitions are all in place to assure protection from the virus.Link on safe votingYou can click here for all your election information needs, including wait times at the polls.last_img