Investors keen on northern suburbs despite lack of stock in area

first_imgMore from newsDigital inspection tool proves a property boon for REA website3 Apr 2020The Camira homestead where kids roamed free28 May 2019One of the rooms inside 281 Kitchener Road, Stafford Heights.He said investors and first homebuyers were keen on purchasing properties in the area.“I’ve had multiple offers on nearly every property,” he said.“There is a lack of stock. I am getting calls from 120 to 130 buyers every month wanting to buy. It’s about competition all the time.”Mr Jessup said investors from Melbourne and Sydney were looking for properties up to $600,000, within 10km from the city.He said the drawcard to the Kitchener Rd home, on a 597sq m block, was that it was a solid double brick home needing some updating. “There’s just nothing under $500,000 around here, that’s why it went,” he said. 281 Kitchener Road, Stafford Heights.A Stafford Heights property has proved extremely popular with buyers keen on a double brick home which sold for $479,000. Selling agent Jonathan Jessup from Johnson Real Estate Chermside said the three-bedroom and one-bathroom residence at 281 Kitchener Rd was bought by a single man last Wednesday.“It sold over the asking price, and I had about three to four offers on the property,” he said. “I’ve just sold 19 houses this year in and around the northern suburbs.”last_img read more

ScienceShot: Eating Moss to Survive

first_imgThe pika does not ask for much. Something green to nibble on, a hole to hide from hawks, and cool air to breathe. Especially that last one, because the chubby gopher-sized relative of rabbits overheats and dies in temperatures greater than 26°C. Thanks to global warming, the pika has disappeared from many of its natural mountain habitats in the U.S. Pacific Northwest, and those that remain tend to migrate to higher elevations. But pockets of pikas are bucking that trend by living stably in shady talus slopes, the accumulated rockfall debris at the base of mountains. The mystery is that there is very little to nibble on down there. Now, a study of the diet of these lowland pikas reveals the food that allows them to eke out a living: moss. Very few herbivores bother with moss because it is mostly rough fiber with not much more nutrition than paper. But the pikas in Oregon’s Columbia River Gorge rely on it for 60% of their diet, the team reports today in the Journal of Mammalogy. To squeeze out every bit of sustenance, they poop the moss out in a form called caecal, which concentrates protein from the plant sixfold. Then they eat it and redigest it. Mystery solved.See more ScienceShots.*Correction, 17 December, 6:20 p.m.: Pikas rely on moss for 60% of their diet, not 80% of their diet, as was previously reported.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)*Correction, 18 December, 11:50 a.m.: The art has been replaced; the previous art depicted lichen, rather than moss.last_img read more