David Barnes joins Baa-Baas committee

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS New role: David Barnes, the former Bath prop, has joined the Barbarians committeeDAVID BARNES has joined the 12-man committee of the Barbarian Football Club.The former Bath prop, who played 266 games for the West Country club before retiring two months ago, has also been chairman of the Rugby Players’ Association for the past six years. Barnes first played for the Barbarians in the inaugural Remembrance Match against the Combined Services in 1997. In the following year he toured Argentina and Uruguay with the side and on the 2010 summer tour he was a member of the Barbarians team that defeated Ireland. In 2006 he played for England against the Barbarians.The Barbarians beat both England and Wales this summer while they kick off their 2011-12 season with the match against South of Scotland in Hawick on Tuesday 11 October in aid of the Bill McLaran Foundation.They continue with a fixture against Australia at Twickenham on Saturday 26 November. Details of the 2012 summer tour will be announced shortly.center_img Great line-up: the Baa-Baas beat England and Wales this summer“It is a great honour for me to be asked to join such a unique rugby institution in whatever capacity,” says Barnes. “I was privileged to play four times for the Barbarians and when their president Micky Steele-Bodger contacted me a few weeks ago I had no hesitation in accepting his invitation.”last_img read more

Zac Guildford suspended for four weeks

first_img“Taking players out of rugby is not something we do lightly.  But we have taken into account the fact that with regard to alcohol-related behaviour, Zac does not have an exemplary record. On this occasion, he embarrassed himself, his family, his teammates, and New Zealand Rugby.  We believe Zac brought the game into disrepute and the sanctions reflect the gravity of the situation and the need for a real pathway to recovery. To his credit, Zac himself has agreed that he needs assistance and recognises that both the NZRU and the Crusaders support him taking time to get himself right,” Sorensen said.Zac Guildford acknowledged his behaviour had been unacceptable, and he was working to resolve his issues. Zac Guildford will miss the opening Super XV season due to a four week suspensionAll Blacks and Crusaders winger Zac Guildford will be suspended from the first four weeks of the Crusaders’ 2012 Investec Super Rugby season, following a New Zealand Rugby Union (NZRU) misconduct hearing into incidents in the Cook Islands last month.The misconduct hearing followed reports of Guildford’s alcohol-related behaviour which the NZRU has deemed were unprofessional and brought the game into disrepute.The NZRU has imposed a number of other sanctions on Guildford including a requirement to undergo alcohol treatment and counselling as directed at his own expense.NZRU General Manager Professional Rugby Neil Sorensen said that the NZRU and Guildford had agreed that professional treatment and counselling provided by external specialists was an essential part of his rehabilitation. “I am embarrassed by what has happened, but I know that I let down the many people who support me.  I am focussed on getting myself into the place I need to be when I return to rugby next year,” he said.The suspension means Guildford is not able to play in the Crusaders’ first three pre-season fixtures in February against the Highlanders in Greymouth, the Hurricanes at Mangatainoka, and against the Rebels in Australia, as well as the opening match of the Investec Super Rugby season, against the Blues at Auckland’s Eden Park on 24 February 2012.  He will be eligible for selection for the Crusaders week two fixture against the Highlanders in Dunedin, on 3 March. BRISBANE, AUSTRALIA – AUGUST 23: Zac Guildford of the All Blacks during a New Zealand All Blacks recovery session at the Anglican Church Grammar School on August 23, 2011 in Brisbane, Australia. (Photo by Phil Walter/Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

Western Force sign Cheetahs fly-half Ebersohn

first_imgCAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA – MAY 12: Cheetahs flyhalf Sias Ebersohn during the Super Rugby match between DHL Stormers and Toyota Cheetahs from DHL Newlands on May 12, 2012 in Cape Town, South Africa. (Photo by Carl Fourie / Gallo Images/Getty Images) Foreign developing players are signed on a two year contract with a Super Rugby franchise and must exhibit potential to play for the Wallabies to be approved by the ARU.Sias EbersohnBorn: 23/02/1989Position: Fly-halfHeight: 176cmWeight: 83kgRepresentative Rugby: 2010 – 2012 Cheetahs, 2009 – 2011 Free State Currie Cup, 2008 – 2010 Free State Vodacom Cup, 2009 IRB Junior World Cup New adventures: Ebersohn looks to develop his talent in Western OzTHE WESTERN Force recruitment drive for the 2013 season is in full swing with the signing of Cheetahs fly-half Sias Ebersohn to the squad on a two year deal as the club’s foreign developing player.Ebersohn is a natural talent in the playmaker role and has been part of the Cheetahs set-up for the past three seasons.  His tactical kicking, communication on the field and confidence in directing play will be a welcome asset to the Emirates Western Force in the seasons to come.RugbyWA CEO Vern Reid said the club had been watching Ebersohn develop as a player over the past two seasons and had made contact with the young flyhalf during the side’s recent visit to Bloemfontein. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS “Following our meeting, Sias has agreed to accept our offer to be the foreign developing player for the Emirates Western Force in the 2013 season,” Mr Reid said.  “The agreement is now before the Australian Rugby Union as they need to approve any foreign developing player contracts under the contracting guidelines.”last_img read more

Craig Dowd

first_imgMajor teams: Auckland, WaspsCountry: New Zealand
Test span: 1993-2000New Zealand caps: 60 (50 starts)Test points: 10 (2T) Born in Auckland in 1969, Dowd rose through the ranks of college and club rugby and made his Auckland debut in 1991. He racked up 83 appearances for the province across a decade, winning the Ranfurly Shield in 1995 and 1996 and the Super 12 title with the Blues in 1996 and 1997.After his Test career ended, he started a new phase of his career in London with Wasps in 2001, playing more than 100 times for them until his retirement in 2005 and adding yet more winner’s medals to his collection as they lifted the Premiership trophy in 2003, 2004 and 2005. TAGS: The Greatest Players Since hanging up his boots, Dowd has had coaching roles with Wasps and North Harbour, done media work and co-founded the sports strapping company d3 Tape in New Zealand in 2010.For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here.center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Props rarely get much glory but if they did, Craig Dowd would be among the most lauded of all because he was one of the foundation stones upon which the great All Blacks team of the 1990s was built, and won a hatful of domestic trophies in both hemispheres to boot.Dowd was one of that rare breed of props who was capable of playing at the highest level on either side of the scrum. A 6ft 3in, 18st-plus giant of a man, he won many of his 60 caps with a No 1 on his back, but switched across to the tighthead after Olo Brown retired in August 1998 and started at No 3 four times during the 1999 World Cup.Brown is best remembered as part of New Zealand’s all-Auckland front row, playing 34 Tests alongside Sean Ftizpatrick and Brown. England’s Jason Leonard says they were the toughest front row he ever faced and their strength and skill enabled stars like Jonah Lomu, Jeff Wilson, Christian Cullen and Frank Bunce to shine in the back division.Lock Ian Jones, a long-time All Blacks team-mate, remembers the contribution Dowd made to the squad’s winning environment in the 1990s, saying: “Guys like Craig Dowd and Sean Fitzpatrick were fiercely competitive and never let our standards drop.”last_img read more

Saints and Sinners: The weekend’s talking points

first_imgHowlers and fouls grabbed some of the headlines in the Aviva Premiership and Guinness Pro12 this weekend, but there were plenty of terrific tries and top tackles to enjoy too. Man on a mission: Luke Cowan-Dickie was unstoppable for Exeter. (Photo: Getty Images) Out of the game: Alex Waller heads for a costly spell in the sin-bin (Photo: Getty Images)The SinnersMen behaving badlyThere was plenty of niggle during Saracens’ 27-12 Aviva Premiership win over Northampton and Saints prop Alex Waller was involved in two of the key incidents, once as the villain and once as the potential victim.Waller was sin-binned after 55 minutes when his side were 12-9 up because when Jamie George barged into him at the back of a ruck, Waller picked him up and tipped him onto his back. While Waller was in the bin George scored a try and Saracens earned a penalty try from a driving maul, so it proved to be a costly moment of madness from him.Saracens wing Chris Ashton could be in far graver trouble as he was accused of biting Waller’s hand during the game. TV footage shows the two grappling at a breakdown, Waller putting his right hand across Ashton’s mouth and he claims Ashton bit him as he tried to wriggle free.On Monday evening Ashton was cited for not one but two biting incidents, so once the judicial panel has examined the evidence and made a decision we will know how much of a villain the wing has been this time. Williams’ wipeoutThe Scarlets slipped to their third Guinness Pro12 defeat of the season but Liam Williams did his very best to keep Ulster at bay.Playing on the wing, Williams made a superb try-saving tackle on Craig Gilroy when the Irishman was in full flight, sprinting down the right wing. Williams chased across and barrelled him into touch with a perfectly timed and executed hit. Ulster were already 11-0 up at that stage and although they went on to win 19-8, it stopped them running away with the game too soon.What a save! Liam Williams does brilliantly to stop Craig Gilroy from scoring. (Photo: Inpho)Worcester Warriors full-back Jamie Shillcock also earns plaudits this week for a try-saving tackle, this time on Semesa Rokoduguni. The Bath wing looked to have scored in the corner but Shillcock’s cover tackle stopped him from grounding the ball. TAGS: Highlight Awesome OspreysThe Ospreys played some outstanding rugby in their 64-10 thrashing of Benetton Treviso, scoring eight tries, including some real beauties.Sam Davies was in fine form, putting his strong-running backs through some tight gaps with well-timed passes, while Josh Matavesi didn’t get his name on the scoresheet but created so much from inside centre with some sublime offloads and scoring breaks.Flying wing: Dafydd Howells scores a spectacular try for the Ospreys. (Photo: Huw Evans Agency)Dafydd Howells gets the prize for finish of the day, diving acrobatically over a tackler to score in the left-hand corner and 18-year-old Keelan Giles came off the bench for the last half-hour to make his Pro12 debut, scored a memorable try with some magical footwork, and made 91 metres of ground from just four carries. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Wing with wow-factor Cardiff Blues made it three wins on the bounce, beating Glasgow Warriors 23-19, and no one contributed more to their win than wing Tom James. He was looking for work all over the pitch, making breaks and consistently carrying across the gain line and ended the game having made 119 metres from 11 carries. If James continues this scintillating form, Warren Gatland will find it hard to ignore him. Wasps sting Bristol Wasps scored ten tries as they trounced Bristol 70-22 in the Aviva Premiership, so they have to feature among the Saints, but it is tough to know who to pick out from an outstanding team performance.Danny Cipriani had a terrific game, Elliot Daly was at his brilliant best and scored two tries (one after the ball had bounced back off the corner flag when Christian Wade had chased a kick from Cipriani). Wade’s dancing feet mesmerised the Bristol defence and he scored two tries, as did Ashley Johnson.Winging in: Christian Wade’s dancing feet flummox Bristol. (Photo: Getty Images)Off to a flier Isa Nacewa played his first Guinness Pro12 match of the season on Friday and started his season in style, scoring 13 points in Leinster’s 33-20 win at Edinburgh.It was the Kiwi’s 150th appearance for Leinster and he showed he still has what it takes at the age of 34, running in a try midway through the first half and kicking four conversions. The SaintsRare hooker’s hat-trickExeter Chiefs No 2 Luke Cowan-Dickie became only the third hooker to bag a hat-trick in an English Premiership match when he crossed for three tries in the win over Harlequins this weekend.He followed in the footsteps of Richard Kirke, who scored three tries in a game for London Irish in 1999, and George Chuter, who did the same for Leicester Tigers in 2004 (thanks to Stuart Farmer for the stats).Cowan-Dickie’s first try was gifted to him by his opposite number Rob Buchanan, who overthrew a lineout a few metres out and the Chief caught the ball at the back and trundled over unopposed.His second and third tries came either side of half time, both from driving mauls, and they gave the Chiefs an unassailable lead in a game they won 36-23. Cowan-Dickie had a terrific game, as did Henry Slade, who showcased his many skills at No 12. Early bath Exeter Chiefs prop Tomas Francis was sent off in their win over Harlequins after clouting Danny Care in the back of his head with his shin. Francis was attempting to toe-poke a ball out of a ruck, but his shin connected with Care before his foot could reach the ball.It was far from being the most well-earned red card you will see and if referees weren’t clamping down on players kicking through at rucks, he wouldn’t have been sent off at all. If officials continue to police the rucks like this, forwards will have to learn to be more careful. Drop flop Newcastle Falcons set up a perfect drop-goal opportunity at the death in their clash with Leicester and were all set to turn a 13-14 deficit into a well-earned win.However, replacement fly-half Joel Hodgson snatched at the kick from in front of the posts and skewed it wide of the upright. The final whistle blew and he sank down onto his haunches, knowing it was a costly miss.Hit and hope: Joel Hodgson tries to kick the winning goal for Newcastle. (Photo: Getty Images) Indecision proves costlyThe Scarlets are still seeking their first win of the season and came close against Ulster, with replacement scrum-half Aled Davies failing to convert a terrific try-scoring chance when Ulster were 11-3 up. Steff Evans and Scott Williams put him through and into the 22 and he had the option to pass inside to James Davies or dummy and go for the line. He delayed the pass too long, then instead of backing himself he tried to send the ball across to Davies, only for Charles Piutau to intercept it and run out of danger. Trio of errors Darren Sweetnam made a horrible mess of a crucial try-scoring chance towards the end of Munster’s Guinness Pro12 clash with the Dragons and was lucky Cian Bohane was there to clear up after him and score what turned out to be the winning try.With Munster trailing 16-13, Sweetnam sprinted down the right wing and was all set to finish off a flowing move by touching down in the corner, but he got back to his feet again in the in-goal are to try to get nearer the posts. Instead he spilled the ball as Hallam Amos hit him with a tackle, but luckily for the Munster wing Bohane won the race to touch down the loose ball and saved some of his blushes.Colm O’Shea also made a costly error for Munster, sending a pass out to Dan Goggin when Amos had already predicted his intention and was waiting in the line to take the interception. The Welshman sprinted 60 metres to score the try but luckily for O’Shea it didn’t end up costing them the match.Dragons replacement James Thomas is also on the naughty step for knocking the ball on when his team were hammering away at the Munster line in stoppage time, trying to grab a winning try. His error allowed the Irish side to clear the ball into touch and secure a 20-16 win. Downpour: Bad weather at the Lanfranchi Stadium washed away Zebre’s hopes. (Photo: Inpho)Thunderstruck Zebre have every reason to be cheesed off by the weather in their home town of Parma as their match against Connacht was called off at half-time due to a hail and thunderstorm. Zebre, who lost their first two Guinness Pro12 matches of the season and have a points difference of minus 59 had been 22-10 up on reigning champions Connacht at the time, so must have been anticipating a famous victory. Now they will have to start from 0-0 when the game is replayed.last_img read more

2 Free Gifts with Rugby World’s new issue

first_img TAGS: Highlight LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS PLUS, THERE’S ALL THIS…Exeter’s Jonny HillDowntime with Carl Fearns of LyonGlasgow’s Pete HorneRising Stars Demba Bamba and Ellie GreenMunster’s Tadhg BeirneInside the Mind of… Ken OwensFirwood Waterloo’s Georgie Perris-ReddingToby Flood’s tips on how to passHartpury College’s Simon LinsellMichaela Blyde on the new Women’s Sevens Series campaignFollow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Coach’s corner: Richard Cockerill assesses his Edinburgh side’s scrum (Inpho)My Life in Pictures… Richard CockerillThe Edinburgh coach takes a trip down memory lane to tell us about triumphs and thumpings, the haka and a headbutt.Club Focus returns!Our monthly round-up of grass-roots news from around the country is back – will your club have made the cut? And if your team has had a successful September, email [email protected] to explain why you think you should win our first Team of the Month award for the 2018-19 season.What it’s like to… lose a leg through rugbyGrace Matthews explains the “freak accident” in a rugby match that changed her life.Timber! Tom Wood has made coffee tables and chopping boards (Daniel Gould)Woodwork with Tom WoodThe Northampton and England back-row gives us a tour of his workshop and talks through his sideline in woodwork. Plus, he reflects on a summer of change at Saints.Should rugby players be viewed as role models?Stuart Barnes and Katie Field present different sides of the argument.Winging in: Chris Ashton at England training (Getty Images)What makes Chris Ashton a prolific scorerSean Holley analyses the Sale Shark’s range of skills and highlights why he thinks the wing is too good for England to ignore.What’s gone wrong at Toulon?The French club’s fans are crazy about rugby, but crowds – and results – have been in decline since their European hat-trick. We investigate the underlying issues. The oval-ball game is growing in Switzerland, with qualification for the 2023 World Cup and 2024 Olympics the targets. We find out more. Find out what’s inside the November 2018 edition of Rugby World magazine 2 Free Gifts with Rugby World’s new issueThe November 2018 edition of Rugby World comes with not one but two brilliant free gifts – a Japan 2019 guide and a Heineken Champions Cup wallchart.On top of all that, the magazine itself is packed with big-name interviews and hard-hitting opinion. Here are 15 reasons to pick up Rugby World’s November 2018 edition…FREE Japan 2019 guideTo mark a year to go until the Rugby World Cup, we’ve compiled a 52-page handbook with all the key particulars you need. As well as providing a rundown of all the teams, stadiums and fixtures, we have wealth of travel information on various destinations in Japan so if you’re going to RWC 2019 you can make the most of what the country has to offer off the field.FREE Champions Cup wallchartThe 2018-19 European season kicks off in mid-October and this Heineken Champions Cup wallchart will allow you to keep track of all the fixtures and TV details as well as fill in the results as the matches happen.In focus: Alun Wyn Jones with his significant shirts (Huw Evans Agency)Alun Wyn Jones exclusiveThe Ospreys, Wales and Lions lock talks favourite jerseys, summer breaks and a global season. Former England fly-half Stuart Barnes also analyses his skill-set from head to toe.Related: What the Wales jersey means to playersEuropean Cups previewIn his pool-by-pool guides to both the Champions and Challenge Cups, Stephen Jones runs the rule over the contenders and predicts who will reach the quarter-finals.Club Hero – Christian WadeJoe Simpson and Jimmy Gopperth pay tribute to the Wasps wing who dazzles crowds with his pace and footwork.Making friends: Alan Dymock poses with a few Connacht supporters (Inpho)Welcome to my Club… ConnachtRugby World’s intrepid reporter Alan Dymock heads to the west of Ireland to spend a day with Connacht’s welcoming fans at the Sportsground.DOWNLOAD RUGBY WORLD’S DIGITAL EDITIONThe Curious Case of Johan GoosenThe Springbok fly-half made headlines when he retired from rugby aged just 24 while playing for Racing 92 in late 2016. Now he’s taking the field for Montpellier in the Top 14. We assess what rugby has learnt from the lengthy transfer saga.Rugby in Switzerlandlast_img read more

Twickenham to stage the European finals

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Pre-match entertainment for the 2015 Clermont v Toulon Champions Cup final at Twickenham (Inpho)The return of spectators, albeit in reduced numbers, is a significant stepping stone towards the full stadiums that rugby, and sport in general, has missed for so long.“Fans are the lifeblood of European club tournaments and we are delighted to be able to welcome them back in a Covid-secure environment for this season’s finals,” said EPCR chief executive Vincent Gaillard. “Twickenham has a storied history with club rugby’s greatest tournament, and it will be a fitting venue to see silverware contested next month.”Marseille had been initially due to stage the finals, but restrictions put in place to limit the transmission of Covid-19 made it impractical to accommodate all ticket holders. The matches have been deferred to 2022 as a consequence. The finals will return to London in 2023 when they will be played at Tottenham Hotspur Stadium.La Rochelle celebrate their quarter-final win over Sale – now they’re eyeing a trip to Twickenham (Inpho)All spectators who attend either of this year’s finals are required to sign up to a code of conduct. Face coverings will be mandatory within the stadium, unless a spectator is in an assigned seat consuming food or beverages, and social distancing will be required at all times.The RFU is working with Richmond Council, and other key stakeholders such as the Metropolitan Police and South Western Railway, to ensure the events are as safe as possible for spectators, staff and local residents. Additional measures will be in place, including increased cleaning, extra toilet provision, assigned gate entry and a revised transport plan.Plans are also advanced for the 2021/22 season with confirmation that 24 clubs – including eight representatives from each of the Gallagher Premiership, Top 14 and Guinness Pro14 – will once again contest the Heineken Champions Cup. Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Twickenham to stage the European finalsThis year’s Heineken Champions Cup and Challenge Cup finals will take place at Twickenham, the home of English rugby. And in a welcome boost, up to 10,000 spectators will be permitted for each game, subject to licences being granted by the local authority.The Challenge Cup final will be on Friday 21 May at 8pm, with the Champions Cup final following on Saturday 22 May at 4.45pm. Tickets for the finals went on sale on Friday 30 April, with prices starting at £45.The Champions Cup final will be an all-French affair, as occurred at Twickenham six years ago. Toulouse defeated Bordeaux-Bègles 21-9 to reach the final for a record seventh time. Victory later this month would make them the first team to win the trophy five times.Up against them will be first-time finalists La Rochelle, who beat Leinster 32-23 at Stade Marcel Deflandre. Will Skelton, the Australian second-row, could win a second winner’s medal following success with Saracens in 2019.Leicester Tigers were the first team to book their place at HQ, beating Ulster 33-24 in the first Challenge Cup semi-final at Welford Road. They will face Montpellier, who dug out a gutsy 19-10 win at Bath in the other semi-final.European Cup finals at Twickenham2000 Northampton 9-8 Munster2004 Wasps 27-20 Toulouse2007 Wasps 25-9 Leicester2012 Leinster 42-14 Ulster2015 Toulon 24-18 Clermontcenter_img Leinster celebrate winning the Heineken Cup in 2012 at Twickenham, which will host the 2021 final (Getty) The home of English rugby will host this year’s Heineken Champions Cup and Challenge Cup finals in May – and fans will be present as Covid-related restrictions start to easelast_img read more

VIDAS responde a necesidades en Puerto Rico

first_img Press Release Service Youth Minister Lorton, VA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Knoxville, TN Director of Music Morristown, NJ Latin America, The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Featured Events This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Featured Jobs & Calls Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit an Event Listing Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Tags Curate Diocese of Nebraska In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Una maestra ayuda a un niño a hacer una impresión de su mano en verde fuera del aula. Foto de Lynette Wilson/ENS[Episcopal News Service – San Juan, Puerto Rico] Insertada detrás de las oficinas administrativas de la Diócesis Episcopal de Puerto Rico en Trujillo Alto, un municipio de ingresos mixtos dentro del área metropolitana de San Juan, se encuentra el Centro San Justo, escuela y guardería infantil que atiende a 140 niños con edades entre los dos meses y los cinco años de edad.El Centro San Justo funciona 50 semanas al año desde las 6:00 A.M. hasta las 5:30 P.M., con un programa flexible que le permite a los padres trabajadores, muchos de los cuales son madres solteras, optar por la atención infantil que más les convenga. San Justo es parte de VIDAS, Episcopal Social Services, Inc., el brazo de servicios sociales de la Diócesis de Puerto Rico, el cual busca responder a las necesidades de individuos y familias que ofrecen servicios integrados destinados a proporcionar una mejor calidad de vida.La diócesis tiene un largo historial de servicios de salud y sociales en la isla, que sigue creciendo y expandiendo en lo que es un momento crítico en Puerto Rico.En años recientes, Puerto Rico, un territorio de EE.UU. cuyos residentes son ciudadanos norteamericanos, ha experimentado cifras récord de migración debido a una arraigada recesión que se remonta a 2006 y a su complicada relación económica con Estados Unidos. En los últimos meses, la crisis de la deuda de 72.000 millones de Puerto Rico y su incapacidad de declararse en quiebra debido a su estatus territorial ha hecho repetidos titulares y ha suscitado comparaciones con Grecia. A principios de agosto, por primera vez en su historia, Puerto Rico incumplió sus obligaciones de pago a sus tenedores de bonos.“Trescientas mil personas se han ido”, dijo el obispo Wilfrido Ramos Orench, que se convirtió en el obispo provisional de la diócesis en marzo de 2014.El 8 de agosto, Ramos hizo pública una carta pastoral en que llamaba a las iglesias a unirse para abordar la crisis económica, a la que llamó la peor crisis económica y social desde la Gran Depresión de la década del 30 del siglo pasado. La carta hace un breve resumen de la historia económica de Puerto Rico a partir de la segunda guerra mundial y hasta que caduca el Código de Rentas Internas que le ofrecía exenciones en impuestos federales a las compañías norteamericanas sobre las ganancias obtenidas en Puerto Rico. El Congreso promulgó la exención en 1976 para estimular el desarrollo económico.“En el momento actual, está más claro que nunca, que estamos atravesando una grave crisis estructural de nuestro modelo económico-político neo liberal,” escribió Ramos en la carta. “El país tiene una gran acumulación de deuda pública y no ha tenido la capacidad de recaudar los fondos necesarios para el pago de la misma.“La respuesta de nuestros gobernantes ha sido reducir los servicios públicos, la imposición de impuestos regresivos, y utilizar los fondos de retiro de los empleados públicos. La capacidad crediticia del gobierno de Puerto Rico es prácticamente nula. Se auguran serias crisis en los servicios de salud, en los sistemas de retiro, y la perspectiva de un posible cierre del gobierno.”Respecto a la carta y a la respuesta de las iglesias a la crisis, “aquí es donde debemos estar”, dijo él durante una entrevista con Episcopal News Service el 12 de agosto.A eso se agrega, de manera más inmediata, una grave sequía que ha obligado a racionar el agua en el área metropolitana de San Juan, incluido Trujillo Alto. Muchos residentes tienen agua un día y luego pasan dos sin ella. El Centro San Justo, explicó la Rda. Ana R. Méndez, directora del mismo y quien también sirve como directora asociada de programa para VIDAS, está funcionando bajo un estado de emergencia y dependiendo de una cisterna.El gobierno de Puerto Rico proporciona ayuda económica a la guardería infantil para contribuir con su empeño de ofrecer asistencia, educación y oportunidades transformadoras a niños y sus familias. En mayo San Justo recibió un certificado de excelencia de la Administración para el Cuidado y Desarrollo de los Niños en reconocimiento a su labor y su compromiso con niños y niñas.Carla Rodríguez, trabaja de voluntaria en el Centro San Justo 20 horas a la semana. VIDAS depende de los voluntarios para ofrecer servicios. Foto de Lynette Wilson/ENS.La mayoría de los estudiantes de la escuela proviene de hogares rotos, donde las mujeres han sido víctimas de altos índices de violencia doméstica, donde uno de los padres, o ambos, pueden estar encarcelados, y en algunos casos las abuelas crían a sus nietos.“Lo más hermoso es la transformación de los niños y las familias, transformación completa”, dijo Méndez en una entrevista con ENS en su oficina.Fue Méndez, educadora por mucho tiempo y ordenada sacerdote episcopal hace siete años, quien vio una necesidad en Loiza, un pequeño pueblo empobrecido de la costa noreste de Puerto Rico, donde ella atiende la misión de Santiago y Felipe, para un programa que prepara a adolescentes embarazadas para la maternidad y la independencia económica, y para educar a otras adolescentes en la prevención del embarazo y de enfermedades de transmisión sexual. Ella fundó Canciones de Cuna en 2009.Además de Canciones de Cuna y de San Justo, el mayor centro de atención infantil, VIDAS dirige otras tres guarderías infantiles, y el Hogar San Miguel, un albergue para menores que han huido de sus familias.En septiembre, la diócesis empezará la construcción en Ponce —con la ayuda de una subvención de $250.000 de la fundación del cantante Marc Anthony— de una instalación que le permitirá extender sus servicios a adolescentes sin hogar.– Lynette Wilson es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit a Press Release The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit a Job Listing Rector Belleville, IL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Tampa, FL VIDAS responde a necesidades en Puerto Rico La isla enfrenta sequía y recrudecimiento de la crisis económicacenter_img Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Bath, NC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Collierville, TN Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Pittsburgh, PA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Washington, DC Rector Albany, NY Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Por Lynette Wilson Posted Aug 21, 2015 Province IX Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZlast_img read more

Misión navaja encuentra terreno fértil para un proyecto de conservación…

first_img Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Bath, NC Los arriates reticulares se cuentan entre algunas de las técnicas para ahorrar agua que la misión El Buen Pastor, en Fort Defiance, Arizona, está usando mientras desarrolla su ministerio agrícola con la ayuda de una subvención de la UTO. Foto de la misión El Buen Pastor.[Episcopal News Service] Arizona puede sonar como el último lugar donde uno encontraría una dinámica empresa agrícola, pero la obra que actualmente se lleva a cabo en la Zona de Misión de Navojalandia está haciendo acopio de las semillas de historia, cultura, tradición, mayordomía ambiental y espiritualidad para cultivar un ministerio local de ilimitadas posibilidades para una pequeña congregación episcopal establecida aquí.La horticultura ha estado activa durante décadas en la misión El Buen Pastor [Good Shepherd Mission] en Fort Defiance, Arizona. En la actualidad, los líderes locales están buscando medios de expandir esos empeños al tiempo de poner énfasis en la conservación, particularmente del agua. Las tradiciones nativoamericanas y las enseñanzas de la Iglesia Episcopal se superponen en ese punto: la importancia de proteger la Tierra y nuestros recursos dados por Dios, dijo la Rda. Cynthia Hizer, vicaria de El Buen Pastor.“Los indígenas han sido ambientalistas durante todo el tiempo que han estado aquí”, dijo Hizer. “La manera en que ellos intervienen en el mundo es venerando la creación”.La más reciente iniciativa para cultivar este suelo fértil es el proyecto de conservación hidráulica ‘Proteger lo valioso’ en la Misión El Buen Pastor, la cual está instalando esta semana un sistema de recolección de agua lluvia para aumentar la operación agrícola de la congregación. Un componente adicional del proyecto conllevará la enseñanza de técnicas agrícolas para ahorrar agua a los granjeros potenciales de la reserva navaja.“El agua es un problema muy grande en el Oeste”, dijo Margaret Putnam, jefa de hortelanos del Buen Pastor. El huerto de la misión, de aproximadamente un cuarto de hectárea, utiliza un sistema de irrigación de goteo suministrada por el acueducto municipal, pero la congregación espera plantar completamente un terreno adicional de otro cuarto de hectárea con el agua lluvia que recoja.La conservación es en sí misma un objetivo del proyecto, añadió Putnam. El usar menos agua municipal es lo que debe hacerse, especialmente en un clima seco como el de Arizona.La misión El Buen Pastor se ha dedicado al maíz azul, cuyo polen también desempeña un papel en las tradicionales ceremonias navajas. Foto de la Misión El Buen Pastor/Facebook.La recolección de agua lluvia en El buen Pastor ha estado respaldada por una subvención de $41.500 del programa de la Ofrenda Unida de Gracias (UTO por su sigla en inglés) de la Iglesia Episcopal. La solicitud de la subvención hacía notar que la región del alto desierto tiene una larga historia de agricultura y de ganadería, pero esas tradiciones han disminuido con el transcurso de las décadas, debido en parte a la degradación del medioambiente.Un caso reciente, particularmente impactante y devastador, fue el vertido accidental de productos químicos tóxicos en el río Ánimas, proveniente de una antigua mina de Colorado, en agosto de 2015. Los desechos de ese vertido fueron a dar al río San Juan, una de las fuentes de agua para la granja navaja de San Cristóbal [St. Christopher’s] en Bluff, Utah, y algunos de los cultivos de esa misión se perdieron.Desde entonces, San Cristóbal decidió extraer agua de pozos artesianos para la irrigación de algunos de sus cultivos, de manera que no tuviera que volver a depender solamente del río, dijo el Rdo. Leon Sampson, un diácono.La solicitud de la subvención Proteger lo Valioso también hace notar que décadas de explotación minera han reducido el manto freático en la reserva y han contaminado gran parte del agua restante. La disminución de los nutrientes, la erosión y el uso de pesticidas son otros factores a que se enfrentan los granjeros navajos.La solución propuesta por el proyecto de conservación hidráulica en El Buen Pastor empieza como algo pequeño, pero tiene un crecimiento potencial en tanto la congregación dirige la iniciativa con el ejemplo y enseña la conservación a otras personas.“Nos entusiasma pensar que los que participan en esta iniciativa profundizarán su respeto por la tierra”, decía la solicitud de subvención de Navajolandia. “Proteger lo valioso puede transformar la manera en que interactuamos con el mundo natural”.Navajolandia es una colección de misiones episcopales en Arizona, Nuevo México y Utah que sirve a las 250.000 personas en los casi 70.000 kilómetros cuadrados de la reserva navaja. Las misiones técnicamente no componen una diócesis porque aún se están esforzando en alcanzar el autosostén económico. Se calcula que un 43 por ciento de la población navaja se encuentra por debajo del umbral de la pobreza, de manera que los líderes episcopales están recurriendo al empresarismo para lograr su objetivo del autosostén y librar a otros de la pobreza.Existe la operación apícola [cría de abejas] que está cobrando forma en El Buen Pastor y en San Cristóbal. Las misiones están trabajando juntas para convertir la producción de harina de maíz azul en una industria artesanal. Y el negocio de jabón hecho a mano de El Buen Pastor ha comenzado a despegar.Hizer ha sido en gran medida responsable de ese crecimiento desde que ella llegó a principios del año pasado, y recientemente la nombraron para integrar el personal del obispo de Navajolandia David Bailey como canóniga para el desarrollo y la empresa social.“Vine con una pasión”, dijo Hizer, quien previamente sirvió en la Diócesis de Atlanta y supervisó un huerto allí.Girasoles que crecen en el huerto de la misión El Buen Pastor. Foto de El Buen Pastor/Facebook.Putnam había trabajado con Hizer como hortelana de una iglesia en Atlanta, y las dos mujeres fueron captadas por El Buen Pastor debido a esa experiencia. Junto con la pasión por el trabajo agrícola, Hizer y Putnam trajeron consigo el conocimiento de diferentes técnicas de cultivo, algunas de las cuales están siendo usadas en El Buen Pastor.Un método eficiente para la conservación del agua es plantar en arriates reticulares: una parcela del huerto se cuadricula —como un gofre gigante— levantando la tierra de tal manera que el agua se acumule en el fondo de cada cuadrado y no se escape.Bermas, o arriates elevados, y acequias, depresiones de poco fondo usadas para retener y canalizar el agua lluvia.“Hay agua”, dijo Hizer. “Uno sencillamente tiene que obtenerla en el lugar preciso y no dejar que se escape cuesta abajo”.Pero esas técnicas de conservación sólo recogen el agua lluvia que cae en el huerto de un cuarto de hectárea o en sus inmediaciones, desperdiciando muchísima lluvia que cae en otra parte. Con la subvención de la UTO, El Buen Pastor comenzará a recoger la lluvia en tres de los 12 edificios de la misión, especialmente en la estación de las lluvias, desde fines de junio a principios de septiembre, y a canalizarla hacia unos tanques con capacidad para miles de litros de agua que luego pueden usarse para irrigar los cultivos.Más agua le permitirá a El Buen Pastor duplicar su capacidad de producción cuando agregue a las parcelas de su huerto otro cuarto de hectárea de terreno, dijo Putnam.El huerto ya es, socialmente, un punto focal para la congregación. Las horas que siguen al oficio del domingo son particularmente propicias para trabajar el suelo, explicó Hizer. Después de la hora del café, algunos se encaminan a las parcelas del huerto y plantan o recogen verduras, o pueden discutir las tradicionales recetas navajas que usarán cuando cocinen la cosecha fresca.En el pasado, el huerto ha producido una gran variedad de hortalizas para que la congregación las prepare y las sirva, así como para vender en un mercado campesino local. Este año, mientras aún crecen los calabacines, las alubias y los girasoles, el foco principal ha sido el maíz azul, porque El Buen Pastor trabaja con [la congregación de] San Cristóbal en un proyecto respaldado por la UTO para etiquetar y mercadear el maíz azul para su venta como harina.La horticultura es un pasatiempo que se remonta a generaciones. Maggie Brown, guardiana mayor en El Buen Pastor, planta algún maíz en su propiedad, lo mismo que hizo su padre antes que ella. Algunas partes de los cultivos, como el polen del maíz azul, también desempeñan un papel en las ceremonias tradicionales de los navajos, dijo ella.Brown percibe un valor en la horticultura como una oportunidad de participación [social] para la misión.“Trabajar en el campo nos da una oportunidad de relacionarnos con la congregación y con cualquiera que esté allí para ayudar”, afirmó.Sampson, el diácono en San Cristóbal, fue clave para la creación y desarrollo de lo que se conoce allí como la Granja Comunitaria Homer Dale, primero como administrador del huerto y luego como diácono. Su labor agrícola tiene una marcada parte espiritual, incorporando la oración y mostrando humildad, y él ve el huerto de la misión como un modo de salvar la brecha entre los mayores que crecieron en el trabajo agrícola y los jóvenes que perdieron la conexión con la tierra.“Creamos un espacio para enseñar a la próxima generación”, dijo Sampson.Un niño le habló a Sampson de la granja que tenía en su casa —y le dijo que había zombis que se comían las cebollas. Sampson se dio cuenta de que el niño se refería a un videojuego. “Nuestros zombis se llaman ardillas listadas y conejos”, le dijo al niño, antes de compartir lecciones del mundo real en horticultura y fe.“En verdad, la granja creció en espiritualidad y comunidad”, afirmó él.La misión El Buen Pastor está cerca de la sede del gobierno tribal en Roca Ventana [Window Rock], Arizona, y Hizer concibe una asociación con las autoridades tribales para adiestrar a los residentes de la reserva en técnicas agrícolas. Ella también tiene una idea para hacer un programa de cocina al estilo de Food Network que incluya recetas que utilicen los ingredientes que les resulten familiares a los navajos.Por ahora, ella y el resto de la congregación de El Buen Pastor tienen mucho que hacer mientras su expandido ministerio agrícola echa raíces.“Con cada pequeños éxito que tenemos, podemos expandirnos un poquito”, afirmó.– David Paulsen es un escritor independiente radicado en Milwaukee, Wisconsin, y miembro de la iglesia episcopal de La Trinidad [Trinity] en Wauwatosa. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Misión navaja encuentra terreno fértil para un proyecto de conservación de agua ‘Proteger lo valioso’ es el ultimo proyecto agrícola en Navajolandia Rector Tampa, FL Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Featured Jobs & Calls Curate Diocese of Nebraska An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Church-Community Agriculture, Submit an Event Listing Por David PaulsenPosted Sep 30, 2016 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Featured Events Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Tags Rector Shreveport, LA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Washington, DC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Smithfield, NC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Navajoland, Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC United Thank Offering In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Belleville, IL Rector Albany, NY Rector Knoxville, TN Press Release Service Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit a Job Listing Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LAlast_img read more

Archbishop of Canterbury talks of suffering during sermon at St…

first_img Rector Albany, NY Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Collierville, TN Middle East Youth Minister Lorton, VA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Martinsville, VA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Press Release Service Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Israel-Palestine, Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Tags Rector Washington, DC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Pittsburgh, PA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Director of Music Morristown, NJ [Anglican Communion News Service] The experience of the church in this region has been of a suffering church for centuries. Sometimes life has been better, sometimes it is less bad. But the nature of suffering is that when it is happening it is all consuming. Every part of life is dominated by it. That is true whether you are a Christian or not, but in this region in addition to the suffering of war, conflict and the tragedies of death and injustice Christians especially are experiencing persecution, are especially threatened.Full article. Submit a Job Listing Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH center_img Rector Smithfield, NC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Curate Diocese of Nebraska Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Anglican Communion, Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Featured Events Posted May 8, 2017 Submit an Event Listing Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Rector Columbus, GA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Press Release This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Tampa, FL Rector Knoxville, TN Archbishop of Canterbury, Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Belleville, IL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Archbishop of Canterbury talks of suffering during sermon at St George’s Cathedral in Jerusalemlast_img read more